How To Detect A Maphacker

This is a discussion on How To Detect A Maphacker within the Dota Forum board part of the Warcraft 3 forum category; How to catch a maphacker! Here's an overview of what maphacks can allow one to do: - Remove fog of ...

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Darchrow's Avatar
    Darchrow is offline Life's good.



    Array
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    1,876
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    15
    Reputation
    1247

    Post How To Detect A Maphacker

    How to catch a maphacker!

    Here's an overview of what maphacks can allow one to do:

    - Remove fog of war (both mainmap and minimap)
    - View invisible units (both)
    - Discern between enemy illusions and heroes
    - View enemy hero skills, experience, and cooldowns
    - View enemy pings
    - View enemy (or ally) heroes in an icon list (explained later)
    - Enable the display of health bars for friendly, enemy, or both
    - Change camera distance, angle, and rotation
    - Allow cancellation of game during any part of the countdown

    Before we begin, one very important thing to remember is that maphack is only able to reveal information that has been sent to the player's computer, but has been censored by the game's engine. It is a surface-level hack, if you get what I mean. Here are a few things maphacking cannot allow one to do:

    Change the inherent mechanics of the game
    View enemy team chat (since this is never sent to your client)
    Control anything you would otherwise not be able to control

    There are some complicated mechanics that I'd like to mention in addition to these.

    Invisible units are still registered by the game engine to be unassailable. Users cannot queue attacks or spells on unavailable invisible units. If the users attempts to do so, it will tell him that he needs a target. If the user attempts to attack using right-click, his hero will move to the ground where the invisible unit was.
    Visible unavailable units can be targeted normally, given the right settings. Users can queue attacks and spells on these units.
    Remember that while the user can see everything, the hero still behaves as though there is no maphacking. Thus, heroes will still lose attack/spell orders if targets become unavailable (i.e. if they go into areas where there would be fog), and heroes will not attack unavailable units when attack-moving.


    Introduction to Detecting Hacks

    This is obviously no simple task. It is possible for a player to have excellent luck, reflexes, and instincts that could be misconstrued as maphacking. On the other hand, it is also possible for a player to be maphacking for an entire game, and to hide his maphacking by being very cautious. This section is intended to give you some ideas about how to pick out the hackers, but the judgments themselves are an unavoidably subjective matter.

    From now on, we will refer to persons who are suspected of using maphacks as "suspects". Players on the opposite team as the suspect will be referred to as "enemies".

    So, how do we go about figuring out the who is hacking? Luck can be the explanation occasionally. Once in a while, you might be on the right side for the rune, or happen upon an enemy while he's neutral creeping. Strategic thinking can also look like maphacking. For instance, it would make sense to fall back from a lane if there are heroes missing from other lanes. However, when someone gets lucky too many times in a row or does things that are beyond the realm of good instincts, it's time to get suspicious. Luckily, most hackers fall prey to a number of hack indicators.

    Here are the central concepts of what to look for:

    Repetition of "lucky" incidents. Too much luck isn't called luck. It's called cheating.
    Unjustified actions. Is the suspect running away from invisible enemies when he's creeping with full health? Is he emptying his bottle to pick up a rune he hasn't seen yet?
    Differences between normal behavior and "stressed" behavior. If someone's overly cautious, they should be cautious most of the time. If there are numerous enemies missing, the suspect should almost always duck for cover. If he ducks when there is unavailable enemies are nearby and does nothing when they're elsewhere, alarm bells should go off.

    One of the most important things to note is this: maphacks cannot improve someone's skill in DotA. If anything, it will make one worse at the game over time. It's like taking off the blindfold while playing "pin the tail on the donkey". Just because you get a better score does not mean that you are better at the game. Keep this in mind when evaluating whether or not someone is hacking.

    Common Indicators

    In this section, we'll discuss some of the most common indicators of maphacking. A person who does these things is often described as "showing maphacks".

    Dead Giveaways: Giving Gold and Selections Through the Fog of War

    Pressing control + c while viewing the replay will show you what object the chosen player is selecting at that instant in time. It is often a good idea to spam control + c throughout the replay at slow speeds while turning off and on the fog of war. If a player is selecting an enemy when the enemy is in the fog it is a DEFINITE maphack, except in the case of selection of the host hero. There are numerous bugs that can cause everyone in the game to select blue in the replay, including host respawn, so don't count on host selection as an indicator. Selection of any other enemy player is a definite give away though.

    Some maphacks also allow players to trade resources (in dota, gold), which is NOT allowed in unhacked dota. If you see the message :player xxx has transfered xxx gold to player xxx" or something of that nature, it's a definite maphack.

    Reaction to Invisible Assailants

    One of the most common indicators. Many times, the suspect will visibly change his behavior in response to a nearby invisible unit. Usually, he will either run back to the tower (for apparently no other reason), run away from the invisible hero, teleport away, or even attack the enemy hero (if his hero has AOE). A classic scenario is this: the suspect is attack-moving while creeping a lane. Perhaps he is still in his own territory. The invisible enemy approaches, and as soon as he is nearby, the suspect will suddenly decide to return to his tower or base, sometimes in the middle of an attack on the creeps.

    A caveat is, of course, that the person might have either heard the enemy windwalking or seen the enemy approaching from another lane. For instance, it would not be unusual for a low-HP hero to return to his base if an enemy Bounty Hunter was not visible on the map. Similarly, if the enemy windwalks when too close to the suspect, the sound effect will play and the suspect will be legitimately warned.

    It can be difficult to decide if a given reaction is due to hacking. There are cases when it may be quite clear, however. In general, if a an suspect has no legitimate reason to react to the presence of the invisible enemy, then it is likely a hacking suspect.

    For instance, let's say that the suspect is Bounty Hunter, fighting a superior Stealth Assassin. If SA approaches and BH suddenly windwalks (prior to engagement), BH is likely to be hacking. There would be no reason for him to windwalk except if he knew that SA was approaching. It would be especially obvious if SA left the area and BH returned to creeping.

    Similarly, let's say the suspect (with high HP) was creeping in his own territory when an invisible unit approached. If the suspect runs back to his base (and does not buy anything), this is likely a hacker.

    One of the clearest cases is when a non-assassin enemy obtains an invisibility rune. For instance, let's say a Centaur Warchief becomes invisible and approaches. If the suspect starts to dodge him or run home, this is a very strong sign of hacking.

    Once again, caution must be used. This paradigm only works if the suspect has no reason to change his behavior. It might be that the suspect was responding to a teammate in distress, collecting a rune, or preparing to participate in a gank or push when he changed his behavior. Also, it is possible for someone to legitimately decide to return home. In this case, repeated reactions to invisible units should be observed.

    Reaction to Unavailable Assailants

    This is very close to the above case, but the main difference is that this can be less obvious, since the threats are usually farther away from the suspect. I don't think I need to go into too much detail on this one. An example would be if the suspect is neutral creeping, and stops in the middle of creeping when an enemy enters the forest.

    Since in this case there may be numerous assailants, it's important to make sure that the suspect isn't just being cautious when he sees few people. Observe the suspect when there are no enemies nearby, but at least two or three of the enemies are not visible on the map. Is he still cautious, or does he continue farming without a care?

    Teleporting is a common reaction in this case. Does the suspect teleport for a good reason? It would make no sense, for instance, to teleport from creeping alone deep within his own territory to another lane that has been pushed farther out.

    Reaction to Prime Targets

    Even suspects who are careful can fall prey to this. Sometimes there will be a desirable enemy target (usually a low-HP one) that either has been unavailable for a while (e.g. while neutral creeping) or is attempting to escape. The suspect will often attack the enemy, even if he should have no idea where the enemy is.

    For instance, let's say that the suspect is NA, and there is an enemy creeping the neutral ancients. It might be likely for the suspect to go to the neutral ancients (since he may want them for himself), but it would be very suspicious if, prior to the enemy becoming available, he used Vendetta and approached. Unless the suspect uses Vendetta to neutral creep, this would be a good indication of hacking.

    An suspect's choice of pathing while chasing a fleeing enemy is also very telltale. Does he know exactly where to go? It's one thing if the enemy makes a beeline for the base, but if the enemy jukes, does he know immediately where to go? An obvious sign is a sudden change of direction when chasing. Another very clear sign is when the suspect suddenly decides to call off the chase when an unavailable enemy comes to assist his target. In this case, we must be careful that his character didn't lose its attack queue because of LOS, or that he called off the chase for a legitimate reason.

    Recall the central concepts when thinking about this case. Is the suspect just too lucky? Does he deviate from normal behavior to chase? Are his actions while chasing justified?

    Collecting Runes

    Runes have an equal likelihood of spawning at either location every two minutes. Does the suspect always go straight to the right rune? Does he always go for the ones that are useful to him and never look when he doesn't need the rune that has appeared? Does he start distancing himself from the area when unavailable enemies collect dangerous runes?

    It's possible that the suspect will just happen to be on the right side repeatedly, or that someone will mention that there is or is not a rune at a certain place. Be sure to watch pings and chat logs. In general, if he goes for the farther rune position without first checking the closer one, hacking is likely.

    When the suspect has a bottle, he will often empty it for no reason before reaching the rune. Let's say that the rune has not been available since it spawned and the suspect is at full HP and mana. He has no reason to empty his bottle to collect the rune before seeing it.

    Neutral Creeping

    A hacking suspect will often skip undesirable neutral creeps and go straight for the ones he wants, especially early in the game. Wolves are easier to kill than golems, for instance, and if an suspect goes right past a golem spawn to reach a wolf spawn without checking the golem one, it may be a bit suspicious.

    Similarly, if neutral spawns in an area were killed by unavailable units and the suspect skips or ignores empty spawn points when he would otherwise (based on his normal behavior) check them, it may be indicative of hacking.

    Use of Hero Abilities

    Maphacking can make it easier for a suspect to use certain hero abilities. These are usually AOE or non-targeted abilities. For example, a Pugna may blast an area for no other reason than to kill an invisible enemy, or a Zeus may use his ultimate to kill an unavailable enemy who had never appeared on the map with low HP.

    Aimed, non-targeted abilities present opportunities for reviewing maphacking. Examples of these would be Meat Hook, Elune's Arrow, Spectral Dagger, and to a lesser extent, Dragonslave. The first three abilities are, in almost all cases, never used for any purpose but to assail enemies. If they are cast on unavailable enemies, then maphacking is possible. They are all difficult in the sense that the suspect could have guessed the location of the unavailable enemy hero, provided that it had been available sometime before. In this case, it is important to review the skill of the hero. For instance, does the Pudge have good skill with hooking in general? If he misses easy hooks and somehow still manages to kill invisible heroes, there's something fishy going on.

    Pings

    Sometimes an suspect's pings can indicate if he knows more than he should. It is rare, but sometimes a maphacker will be so brazen as to ping unavailable enemy heroes. Sometimes, the ping may be legitimate (for instance, if a hero is missing from a lane), but watch the accuracy of the ping and its timing. These factors can give away a hacker.

    It is also possible to confuse an orange ping with a brown ping. Watch to see if the suspect reacts to the enemy ping.

    Additional Topics

    Reaction to Accusations

    Often, when a player comes under suspicion for maphacking, the enemy team will comment and his behavior will change. Unfortunately, it's far too difficult to judge his guilt on the basis of his written responses to the accusations, but it may be possible to look for signs in his playing behavior. Maphackers will often begin to be more cautious about showing hacks. However, their reactions tend to be lopsided. They may engage in aggressive activity (such as ganking or chasing unavailable enemies) less often, but their defensive activity tends to remain the same. Hacking suspects will usually still respond to invisible units, for instance. The difficulty here is that an innocent suspect may also become less aggressive while still being the same defensively. This technique is thus most effective for suspects who show overt defensive signs of hacking (such as reacting to single invisible enemies).

    Careful Hackers

    It is not always possible to detect maphacks. Sometimes, a suspect will be hacking, but will allow himself to be ganked, or will force himself to avoid reacting to an invisible enemy. In this case, it is very difficult to distinguish between a skilled player and a hacker. The best thing to do is to watch the player carefully over the course of the game. He is bound to make at least one or two mistakes, such as emptying a bottle prior to seeing a rune, moving to help an ally who hasn't been attacked yet, or reacting far too quickly to a sudden threat.

    For instance, a careful suspect may see an invisible enemy nearby and may have primed Eul's to immediately be used. This, of course, could be due to fast reflexes. Watch the suspect in normal situations. Are his reflexes and "battle senses" still as sharp?

    Fog of War Miscalculations

    It is very difficult for a suspect to discern what areas are unavailable when the "Fog of War" hack is enabled, because everything looks like it's visible. Even if the "Players" setting is used, when the suspect's field of view is merged with an enemy field, he may believe the enemy hero is still in his vision even though it is not. This comes into play very often. Even careful hackers may pretend to miss an enemy hero and then suddenly chase them, in order to make it look as though the encounter was accidental. Watch carefully to see if the enemy hero actually did appear in the suspect's field of view. Sometimes obstacles and terrain can make suspects miscalculate the field.

    The only time this does not occur is if the suspect has configured the appropriate settings in the "Fog Players" section. It is very unlikely that a hacking suspect would know how to use this, however.

    Helpful Programs

    DotA Replay Manager
    Enemy Click Checker
    C_Parse
    Replay Seeker

    Forum it originated from.. Somewhere in here atleast I think
    http://www.banlist.nl/phpBB3/index.php

    Credit goes out to Knives @ useast from Banlist.nl

    Original thread: http://www.dotacash.com/forums/ban-r...-a-map-hacker/


  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Darchrow For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Lembidi is offline Newbie
    Array
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    0
    Reputation
    0

    Thank's

    WooW, thanks u very much!! this will helpfully when i play on the Bnet, Say to Black Hole!! Darchrow!!

  4. #3
    NinjaMan2's Avatar
    NinjaMan2 is offline Newbie
    Array
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    0
    Reputation
    0
    What do you mean by that?

    *The only time this does not occur is if the suspect has configured the appropriate settings in the "Fog Players" section. It is very unlikely that a hacking suspect would know how to use this, however.

  5. #4
    Darchrow's Avatar
    Darchrow is offline Life's good.



    Array
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    1,876
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    15
    Reputation
    1247
    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaMan2 View Post
    What do you mean by that?

    *The only time this does not occur is if the suspect has configured the appropriate settings in the "Fog Players" section. It is very unlikely that a hacking suspect would know how to use this, however.
    In some hacks you can configure that the HP bar for example is shown in a grey color if the hero is under the fog of war. So even if you hack and all enemies are visible you are able to know if a hero is out of your vision with that feature.
    Or disable "Make units clickable".


  6. #5
    NinjaMan2's Avatar
    NinjaMan2 is offline Newbie
    Array
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    0
    Reputation
    0
    Thanks for your tip and congratulations for your guide, once more.

  7. #6
    mingy is offline Newbie
    Array
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    0
    Reputation
    0
    I read almost all of it. But you take no consideration of wards? Like the guy always getting the runes, well if you don't play a noob game but abit higher skilled game your support should make sure it's always warded on atleast one rune so you don't have to guess where the rune is.

  8. #7
    stewingbeef is offline Newbie
    Array
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    U.S
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    0
    Reputation
    0
    if you watch a replay it shows presence of wards on both sides.

  9. #8
    hotkeyMODwanted is offline Newbie
    Array
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    3
    Reputation
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Darchrow View Post
    One of the most important things to note is this: maphacks cannot improve someone's skill in DotA. If anything, it will make one worse at the game over time. It's like taking off the blindfold while playing "pin the tail on the donkey". Just because you get a better score does not mean that you are better at the game. Keep this in mind when hacking.
    I like this quote because its so true. I definitely agree that hacking actually decreases "real" skill. It prevents players from learning how to truly adapt and improve. You might get a higher score, but you will stay at a "casual" level of play only winning by cheating, and never become a truly great player because you rely too much on an unfair advantage.

    It should also be noted that by cheating, your not only ruining just one other persons fun, your ruining the community as a whole, by causing players to get frustrated and possibly quit the game. I've heard people say they would rather play with a bunch of cheaters instead of a bunch of newbs, but thats just not right. If there could be lobbies with fog of war disabled for all players, maybe then the cheaters would see how dumb the game is when your all cheating.
    Last edited by hotkeyMODwanted; 06-10-2017 at 05:46 AM.

  10. #9
    PeaceDaBall's Avatar
    PeaceDaBall is offline Newbie
    Array
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Lodnon
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    0
    Reputation
    0
    How annoying are these Maphacker !

Similar Threads

  1. [Discuss] Looking for A nice maphacker player for team on NA
    By pnkilleur in forum Starcraft 2 forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-20-2011, 12:09 AM
  2. maphacker reported
    By Dieter123 in forum Warcraft 3 forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-09-2008, 06:40 PM
  3. What MH is detect ?
    By lLoolL in forum Warcraft 3 forum
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 06-18-2007, 05:29 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •