pearl habor in cyberspace

This is a discussion on pearl habor in cyberspace within the General Chat board part of the General category; (CNN) -- It is June, the children are out of school, and as highways and airports fill with vacationers, rolling ...

Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    35yeros's Avatar
    35yeros is offline Im still on a Boat.
    Array
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    N38°52'14" W77°03'19" its funny because it might be true
    Posts
    1,647
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    12
    Reputation
    560

    pearl habor in cyberspace

    (CNN) -- It is June, the children are out of school, and as highways and airports fill with vacationers, rolling power outages hit sections of Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington and New York. An airliner is mysteriously knocked off the flight control system and crashes in Kansas.
    Parts of the 911 service in Washington fail, supervisors at the Department of Defense discover that their e-mail and telephone services are disrupted and officers aboard a U.S. Navy cruiser find that their computer systems have been attacked.
    "If somebody wanted to launch an attack, it would not be at all difficult."
    "Jon Kyl, R-Arizona, chairman of a Senate technology subcommittee, reported that nearly two-thirds of U.S. government computers systems have security holes. "

    -- Fred B. Schneider, a professor of computer science at Cornell University
    As incidents mount, the stock market drops precipitously, and panic surges through the population.
    Unlikely? Hardly. The "electronic Pearl Harbor" that White House terrorism czar Richard A. Clarke fears is not just a threat, it has already happened.
    Much of the scenario above -- except for the plane and stock market crashes and the panic -- occurred in 1997 when 35 hackers hired by the National Security Agency launched simulated attacks on the U.S. electronic infrastructure.
    "Eligible Receiver," as the exercise was called, achieved "root level" access in 36 of the Department of Defense's 40,000 networks. The simulated attack also "turned off" sections of the U.S. power grid, "shut down" parts of the 911 network in Washington, D.C., and other cities and gained access to systems aboard a Navy cruiser at sea.
    At a hearing in November 1997, Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Arizona, chairman of a Senate technology subcommittee, reported that nearly two-thirds of U.S. government computers systems have security holes.
    "If somebody wanted to launch an attack," says Fred B. Schneider, a professor of computer science at Cornell University, "it would not be at all difficult."

    stupid americans and there security systems :-)

    When in doubt, empty the magazine, They dont pay you to bring home bullets

  2. #2
    Ryan's Avatar
    Ryan is offline Ubiquitous


    Array
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    6,966
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    26
    Reputation
    2758
    Americans Did However Invent A Lot Of Weapons That Were Really Powerful Back In 1930+

    The Nuclear Bomb Was The Most Destructive, And In My Opinion, Was Not Really Required To Send To Japan.


  3. #3
    35yeros's Avatar
    35yeros is offline Im still on a Boat.
    Array
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    N38°52'14" W77°03'19" its funny because it might be true
    Posts
    1,647
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    12
    Reputation
    560
    yes they did, i just think that some things they create are worthless, like how there airforce spends 253 million and most of it will get "trashed" becasue they cant use the parts before the part get outdated.
    Last edited by 35yeros; 01-17-2008 at 05:57 PM.
    When in doubt, empty the magazine, They dont pay you to bring home bullets

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •